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Does Bill 160 threaten worker safety

Does Bill 160 threaten worker safety

In a recent three-quarter page Toronto Star advertisement, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) and the Ontario Compensation Employees Union (OCEU) have complained that the government’s proposed legislation, Bill 160, will endanger Ontario’s workers. Using some selective statistics, the joint advertisement claims that injuries and deaths have decreased since WSIB assumed responsibility for prevention in 1998.

It also claims that Bill 160 would represent an unfair tax load for some employers, apparently ignoring the present unequal burden of prevention costs.

The advertisement also suggests the Ministry of Labour – who is responsible for the Occupational Health and Safety Act – might not be the best place to locate prevention services. Noting that the whole point of the OHSA is to create workspaces that minimize or eliminate work injuries, it is not altogether easy to follow this logic.

It is hard to escape the fear of job losses at the WSIB as the main thrust behind this advertisement. That might be a legitimate and justifiable concern, but from our reading of the proposed legislation, we fail to see the peril that this legislation might introduce to the workplace.

It should be remembered that when Bill 99 created the WSIB, there was great fanfare in the announcement that the new Board would function as ‘an insurance company’. Responsibility for rehabilitation was off-loaded because that was not the proper job of an insurer, we were told. So it might seem to be ironic that when we are in the midst of rehabilitation services returning to the WSIB, they are losing prevention services – something else that never really seemed to jive with being ‘an insurance company’.

Posted by Paul Harris

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